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Ankle/Foot : Plantar Fasciitis
on 2007/5/2 15:40:00 (3349 reads)

Inflammation of the fascia on the bottom of the foot is the most common cause of heel pain.

There are many documented causes of plantar fasciitis. Poor flexibility of the calf muscles, no arch support, a sudden increase in one's level of activity, poor footwear, being overweight, excessive pronation, or repetitive stress conditions (long distance running). Common causes of a bruised heel bone are poor cushioning of the heel due to fat pad atrophy (shrinkage in the size of the fat pad) poor footwear, excessive walking on hard surfaces, and being overweight.



Depending on which medical study you read, anywhere form 8-21% of the population suffers from plantar fasciitis. The pain is typically located at the front of the base of the calcaneus. Less often, the pain extends along the arch of the foot. The result is micro-tearing of the plantar fascia where it attaches to the base of the calcaneus. An ensuing inflammatory response occurs producing pain, swelling, warmth, loss of function (difficulty with any standing or walking), and less often, redness.

Plantar fasciitis is often worst in the morning when one takes his /her first steps out of bed. Theories propose that when we are sleeping, the inflamed fascia is shortening and perhaps attempting to heal. If the problem is chronic, a bone spur may be seen on x-ray.


Possible Treatments
Active Range of Motion (AROM)
Active Assistive Range of Motion (AAROM)
Cryotherapy or Cold Therapy
Electrotherapeutic Modalities
Gait or Walking Training
Isometrics
Iontophoresis
Mobilization
Progressive Resistive Exercises (PRE)
Passive Range of Motion (PROM)
Proprioception Exercises
Physical Agents
Soft Tissue Mobilization
Stretching/Flexibility Exercise

Possible Treatment Goals
Improve Balance
Decrease Risk of Reoccurrence
Improve Fitness
Improve Function
Improve Muscle Strength and Power
Increase Oxygen to Tissues
Improve Proprioception
Improve Range of Motion
Self-care of Symptoms
Improve Tolerance for Prolonged Activities




 
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